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Chamorro Roots Genealogy Project™ ~ Håle´ Taotao Håya

List of Native Friendlies on Guam: World War II Declassified Document[0]

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GuamOpDeclassified

In a World War II declassified document that was contained in Appendix #7 to Annex “B”., Operation Plan #1-44 of the III PHIB Corps Report on Guam Operation, the military had compiled a list of 40 people on Guam that were believed to be reliable and with considerable influence with the natives on Guam. This was part of the intelligence information gathering used towards the assault and reoccupation of Guam.

I found this list to be of interest particularly with some of the notes of each individual.

TextOfList

Title

First Name

Middle

Last name

Note

 

Arthur

 

Anderson

Approx. age 38. Mechanic and power plant man.

 

Jesus

 

Artero

Approx. age 43. Excellent guide. Lives near Pati Point.

 

Edwardo

 

Calvo

Approx. age 39. Civil affairs and bank cashier.

Reverend

Oscar

Lujan

Calvo

Approx. age 29. Welfare work among natives.

 

Vicente (Ben)

Calvo

Approx. age 53. Chief Clerk, Supply Dept.

Judge

   

Camacho

Approx. age 65.Thoroughly cognizant of Island Judiciary.

 

"Dolong"

 

Concepcion

Approx. age 38. Surveyor and guide.

 

Elsie

 

DeLeon

Approx. age 33. Clerk.

Reverend

Jesus

Baza

Duenas

Approx. age 38. Welfare and native cooperation work.

 

Nieves

M.

Flores

Filipino, age about 48. Cadastral affairs and surveyor.

 

Ruth

 

Flores

Approx. age 21. Clerk and Stenographer.

 

Joaquin

 

Guerrero

Approx. age 26. Clerk, typist and stenographer.

 

Pedro

 

Guerrero

Approx. age 39. Surveyor and an excellent man in the bundock's.

 

Vicente

P.

Herrero

Approx. age 58. Supervisor of native labor.

 

Jose (Joe)

 

Indalecio

Approx. age 35. Electrician and guide.

 

F. (Ben Cook)

R.

Ishizaki

Known to have been one of two  "5th Columnists," and to be "apprehended as soon as possible and escorted to Corps C.P., when established ashore, without delay."

Mrs.

Agueda

 

Johnston

Approx. age 48. Civil affairs.

 

Herbert

 

Johnston

Approx. age 33. Cleark and good contact man.

 

Thomas

 

Johnston

Approx. age 23. Instrument man or draftsman.

 

Jose

L.G.

Leon Guerrero

Approx. age 39. Engineering aide.

 

Jose

 

Lujan

Approx. age 61. Influential in a quiet way. Many family and business connections.

 

William (Bill)

Lujan

Approx. age 43. Valuable assistant in any job requiring development of native cooperation.

 

Pedro

 

Martinez

Approx age 53. Best business man on the Island. Formerly a Government Clerk.

Mrs.

   

Mesa

Approx. age 43. Invaluable organizer of woman labor.

 

Francisco

 

Palacios

Approx. age 38. Surveyor.

 

Vicente

R.

Palomo

Approx. age 35. Engineer.

Don

Anastacio

 

Perez

Approx. age 73. Civil aid and also in a judicial capacity.

 

Isabel

Taitano

Perez

Approx. age 41. Daughter of "Don" Perez. Valuable for work among Chamorro women.

 

Jesus

Rosario

Rivera

Approx. age 41. Chief Clerk, Pan Amer. Airways, Assistant manager of airport.

 

Juan

 

Roberto

Approx. age 53. Administrative affairs.

Reverend

Joaquin

 

Sablan

Approx. age 38. Welfare work.

 

Ramon

M.

Sablan

Approx. age 49. Surgeon and an able practitioner.

 

Francisco

 

Salas

Approx. age 25. Engineer aide.

 

Jose

 

Salas

Approx. age 49. Engineer

 

Vicente (Ben)

San Nicolas

Chief of plumbing shop. Familiar with water supply and sewage system.

 

Simon

A.

Sanchez

Approximate age 48. School superintendant.

Mrs.

   

Sawada

Known to have been one of two  "5th Columnists," and to be "apprehended as soon as possible and escorted to Corps C.P., when established ashore, without delay."

 

George

 

Scharff

German citizen. Dredge foreman (ONI says he may be trusted to be loyal in any circumstances while another source states he is not to be trusted.)

 

Richard

 

Taitano

Approx. age 23. Surveyor and engineer.

 

Vicente (Ben)

Zafra

Approx. age 43. Knowledge of agricultural conditions in the Island Administrative affairs.

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 28 August 2014 00:08
 

The Beginning of the Taotao Håya-Unangan (Chamorro-Aleut) Clan: The Legacy of John Fratis and His Descendants[1]

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The Beginning of the Taotao Håya-Unangan (Chamorro-Aleut)[1] Clan:

The Legacy of John Fratis and His Descendants

Bernard T. Punzalan

Chamorro Roots Genealogy Project™

© August 20, 2014

 

1892 John Fratis Deposition Exerpt


Background

In a previous article I summarized a little on John Fratis, a “Chamorro,” who made his way to Alaska around March 1869 as a whaler. I was so intrigued by this discovery I decided to take a journey to research more about him, his family and their descendants.

I am fortunate to have made contact with and collaborate with Byron Whitesides, an Unangan (Aleut) with kin who have married into the Fratis family and maintains a genealogy database on his relatives. I have therefore incorporated some of his data into the Chamorro Roots Genealogy Project database. Coincidently, Byron was in the military, was stationed on Guam and his son was also born there; such a small world with blessings indeed.

To recap the information from the 1900 Census that was the impetus for this write-up, John Fratis was listed as being married to Aklina (Akalina) Krukoff, an Unangan, born around 1872. She was also the daughter of Chief Nikolai Ivanov Krukov and Ekaterina “Katherine” Kriukov[2]. That Census also listed four of their children living with them on Saint Paul Island, Alaska: Agrafina (b. 1892), Simon John (mostly recorded as Simeon b. 1894), Julia/Ouliana (b. 1898/1896), and Martha (b. 1899). John had died in 1906.

1900 Census Sample

As I continued with this journey, I discovered that John Fratis seems to have had a prior marriage with another woman also of Unangan descent. At this point I have not been able to identify her; however, they had at least three children: Susanna (b. 1875), Ellen (b. 1883) and John Jr. (b. 1886).

Fratis Surname

The surname Fratis seems to be tied to Portuguese descent; however, it is uncertain at this point if that was John’s real surname or phonetically spelled name among the possibilities. However, on July 1, 1870 (one year after John’s arrival at St. Paul), a list of resident natives of St. Paul Island was recorded by Philip Volkov and later republished in a variety of U.S. Government and Congressional documents. Although the name John Fratis does not appear, quite close to the end of the list appear the names “Domian M. Kok (John Frater), Oolyahnah, his wife, Anna, his daughter.” I have flagged these names as a potential of being the beginning of John’s first family in St. Paul.

1870 List of Natives

[Click "READ MORE" below to continuing reading this extensive article.]

Last Updated on Wednesday, 20 August 2014 08:02 Read more...
 

1900 US Census: Chamorro Diaspora[0]

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Sifting through the 1900 U.S. Census in search of Chamorro people and their families so far has netted me 159 people. At the time, these people resided across three U.S. Territories: Alaska, Arizona and Hawaii; and two States: Washington and California. As a refresher, Guam, at least the civilian sector, was not included in the U.S. Census until 1920.

If you have read some of my previous articles, you might have noticed that some of the surnames may have been phonetically spelled and recorded in official documents. This continues to hold true for several of the surnames of those found in the 1900 Census.

1900 Chamorro Diaspora U.S. Map

Alaska

I was quite surprised to find two people (one who had a family) living/working in Alaska. At Hunters Bay Cannery, Manuel Conception, age 33, was recorded as a Cook.

The other was John Fratis, listed as from the “Chamorro,” Tribe and Clan, and a farmer at the age of 54. He was married to Ankeelena an Aleut, age 26. Together, they had four children living with them on Saint Paul, Alaska: Simeon (6), Agrafina (8), Uliana (4), and Martha (1). According to the Census document John Fratis arrived in Alaska sometime in March 1869.

Arizona

Only one person by the name of Enas Logan, single, age 24 was listed in Maricopa, Arizona with the occupation of “Day laborer.” He immigrated to the U.S. sometime in 1888.

California

California had a total of 26 people with ties to Guam. Only two men were married, both to women of Mexican descent and no children. The five areas of California occupied were Almaden, Bodega, San Francisco, Soquel, and Ocean. Most of them were laborer of sorts, cooks long shoremen and fishermen.

Surnames found were Adriano, Castro, Ferran, Flores, Garcia, Gerrero/Gurreiro, Gumatata, Lasama, Logan, Lorindo, Martinez, Mazza, Mendiola, Oroso, Peres/Perez, Sauders, Yarrado

Hawaii

As expected, the Hawaiian Islands had the majority where I identified 120 people with ties to Guam. The four primary Hawaiian Islands occupied by these people were inclusive of:

  • Oahu (Honolulu and Ewa) – 66
  • Hawaii (Big Island) – 19
  • Maui (Makawao, Wailuku and Lahaina) – 23
  • Kauai (Koloa and Lihui) – 5

Men that had families married women primarily from Hawaiian or Portuguese descent; one man married a woman of Singapore descent while another had married a woman with origins from the Azores Islands.

Surnames were comprised of Arriola/Arreola, Castro, Cruz/Kruz, Duenas, Foster, Guerrero, Ignacio, Legama, Luhan, Pangelinan, Otis, Perez, Reys, Rose, Sanpos, Santos, and Tenora.

Washington

Only two men, both single, were found in Washington State. George August, age 66 was a farmer in Port Madison, Washington. He immigrated to the U.S. in 1860. While Domingo Blas, age 32, was a Sailor in Aberdeen Town and immigrated to the U.S. in April 1868.

Reference:

United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900.


[Click "READ MORE" below to view the names]


Last Updated on Thursday, 14 August 2014 01:51 Read more...
 

Database Update 10 August 2014[0]

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The database has been updated and has grown from 317,422 to 318,954 names.

 

1901 Navy Employees[0]

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On July 1, 1901, approximately, 199 people all with Guam as their place of birth, were listed as working with the Navy Department.

  • Carpenters = 6
  • Coal Passer = 9
  • Cook = 1
  • Labor Foreman = 1
  • Laborer = 180
  • Mason = 1
  • Special Laborer = 1

Two laborers and one cook were paid on a monthly basis at $6/month each. The remaining 193 people were paid at a daily rate. The average daily pay rate was approximately 41 cents/day.

It seems apparent from these records that there seemed to be major pay wage disparities between Americans and Chamorro employees with the latter receiving significantly less. This was the beginning and would eventually (much later) become a public issue in front of Congress in 1947 among other key issues for Guam and her people.

However, some of these issues (but not all) were not addressed until the passage of the 1950 Organic Act. Some of these disparities were written about by former Guam Legislative Speaker Carlos Pangelinan Taitano in 1996.

Sources

Ancestry.com. US, Register of Civil, Military, and Naval Service, 1863-1959 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

Department of Commerce and Labor, Bureau of the Census. Official Register of the United States, Containing a List of the Officers and Employees in the Civil, Military, and Naval Service. Digitized books (77 volumes). Oregon State Library, Salem, Oregon.

Taitano, Carlos P. 1996. Guam’s Political Development. Retrieved August 4, 2014 from: http://www.guampedia.com/guams-political-development/

(Click on "READ MORE" below to view all 199 names.)

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 August 2014 07:55 Read more...
 
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In order for this project to continue to grow, I have implemented a nominal $5/month subcription fee to access the Chamorro Roots Genealogy Project database. This fee can be paid through the Tendan Hale' Chamoru link. For newly Registered Users, there will be a one-time 3-day trial subscription granted automatically with new registrations. This trial offer is also to allow newly registered users the opportunity to experience the difference between the 'Demo Database' and the live database. Once the 3-day trial period has expired you will only have access to the Demo Database that has very limited features.

You must be a Registered User of this site take advantage of the trial offer and you must be a Registered User to access the demo database. The menu option to access the database will become accessible once you have completed the Chamorro Roots Genealogy Project Registration process.  And by the way...registration to this site is free

The Demo Database has very limited features and few links availalble, while the live database will have all the normal features available and names transcribed from census documents and other sources. 

I highly recommend taking advantage of and subscribing to the 'Chamorro Roots Library' subcription option, since its for one-year access and includes viewing the digital files available on this site for $60/year.  However, this fee is not prorated like the monthly subscription that is also only limited to accessing the database and not the digital archives.  I believe these subscription fees are nominal and quite reasonable compared to the other commercially available genealogy sites.

I appreciate your understanding and support to this upcoming change.  If you have any question please feel free to contact me.

Si Yu'os Ma'ase,

si Bernard Punzalan