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The Beginning of the Taotao Håya-Unangan (Chamorro-Aleut) Clan: The Legacy of John Fratis and His Descendants[0]

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The Beginning of the Taotao Håya-Unangan (Chamorro-Aleut)[1] Clan:

The Legacy of John Fratis and His Descendants

Bernard T. Punzalan

Chamorro Roots Genealogy Project™

© August 20, 2014

 

1892 John Fratis Deposition Exerpt


Background

In a previous article I summarized a little on John Fratis, a “Chamorro,” who made his way to Alaska around March 1869 as a whaler. I was so intrigued by this discovery I decided to take a journey to research more about him, his family and their descendants.

I am fortunate to have made contact with and collaborate with Byron Whitesides, an Unangan (Aleut) with kin who have married into the Fratis family and maintains a genealogy database on his relatives. I have therefore incorporated some of his data into the Chamorro Roots Genealogy Project database. Coincidently, Byron was in the military, was stationed on Guam and his son was also born there; such a small world with blessings indeed.

To recap the information from the 1900 Census that was the impetus for this write-up, John Fratis was listed as being married to Aklina (Akalina) Krukoff, an Unangan, born around 1872. She was also the daughter of Chief Nikolai Ivanov Krukov and Ekaterina “Katherine” Kriukov[2]. That Census also listed four of their children living with them on Saint Paul Island, Alaska: Agrafina (b. 1892), Simon John (mostly recorded as Simeon b. 1894), Julia/Ouliana (b. 1898/1896), and Martha (b. 1899). John had died in 1906.

1900 Census Sample

As I continued with this journey, I discovered that John Fratis seems to have had a prior marriage with another woman also of Unangan descent. At this point I have not been able to identify her; however, they had at least three children: Susanna (b. 1875), Ellen (b. 1883) and John Jr. (b. 1886).

Fratis Surname

The surname Fratis seems to be tied to Portuguese descent; however, it is uncertain at this point if that was John’s real surname or phonetically spelled name among the possibilities. However, on July 1, 1870 (one year after John’s arrival at St. Paul), a list of resident natives of St. Paul Island was recorded by Philip Volkov and later republished in a variety of U.S. Government and Congressional documents. Although the name John Fratis does not appear, quite close to the end of the list appear the names “Domian M. Kok (John Frater), Oolyahnah, his wife, Anna, his daughter.” I have flagged these names as a potential of being the beginning of John’s first family in St. Paul.

1870 List of Natives

[Click "READ MORE" below to continuing reading this extensive article.]

Last Updated on Wednesday, 20 August 2014 08:02 Read more...
 

1900 US Census: Chamorro Diaspora[0]

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Sifting through the 1900 U.S. Census in search of Chamorro people and their families so far has netted me 159 people. At the time, these people resided across three U.S. Territories: Alaska, Arizona and Hawaii; and two States: Washington and California. As a refresher, Guam, at least the civilian sector, was not included in the U.S. Census until 1920.

If you have read some of my previous articles, you might have noticed that some of the surnames may have been phonetically spelled and recorded in official documents. This continues to hold true for several of the surnames of those found in the 1900 Census.

1900 Chamorro Diaspora U.S. Map

Alaska

I was quite surprised to find two people (one who had a family) living/working in Alaska. At Hunters Bay Cannery, Manuel Conception, age 33, was recorded as a Cook.

The other was John Fratis, listed as from the “Chamorro,” Tribe and Clan, and a farmer at the age of 54. He was married to Ankeelena an Aleut, age 26. Together, they had four children living with them on Saint Paul, Alaska: Simeon (6), Agrafina (8), Uliana (4), and Martha (1). According to the Census document John Fratis arrived in Alaska sometime in March 1869.

Arizona

Only one person by the name of Enas Logan, single, age 24 was listed in Maricopa, Arizona with the occupation of “Day laborer.” He immigrated to the U.S. sometime in 1888.

California

California had a total of 26 people with ties to Guam. Only two men were married, both to women of Mexican descent and no children. The five areas of California occupied were Almaden, Bodega, San Francisco, Soquel, and Ocean. Most of them were laborer of sorts, cooks long shoremen and fishermen.

Surnames found were Adriano, Castro, Ferran, Flores, Garcia, Gerrero/Gurreiro, Gumatata, Lasama, Logan, Lorindo, Martinez, Mazza, Mendiola, Oroso, Peres/Perez, Sauders, Yarrado

Hawaii

As expected, the Hawaiian Islands had the majority where I identified 120 people with ties to Guam. The four primary Hawaiian Islands occupied by these people were inclusive of:

  • Oahu (Honolulu and Ewa) – 66
  • Hawaii (Big Island) – 19
  • Maui (Makawao, Wailuku and Lahaina) – 23
  • Kauai (Koloa and Lihui) – 5

Men that had families married women primarily from Hawaiian or Portuguese descent; one man married a woman of Singapore descent while another had married a woman with origins from the Azores Islands.

Surnames were comprised of Arriola/Arreola, Castro, Cruz/Kruz, Duenas, Foster, Guerrero, Ignacio, Legama, Luhan, Pangelinan, Otis, Perez, Reys, Rose, Sanpos, Santos, and Tenora.

Washington

Only two men, both single, were found in Washington State. George August, age 66 was a farmer in Port Madison, Washington. He immigrated to the U.S. in 1860. While Domingo Blas, age 32, was a Sailor in Aberdeen Town and immigrated to the U.S. in April 1868.

Reference:

United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900.


[Click "READ MORE" below to view the names]


Last Updated on Thursday, 14 August 2014 01:51 Read more...
 

Database Update 10 August 2014[0]

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The database has been updated and has grown from 317,422 to 318,954 names.

 

1901 Navy Employees[0]

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On July 1, 1901, approximately, 199 people all with Guam as their place of birth, were listed as working with the Navy Department.

  • Carpenters = 6
  • Coal Passer = 9
  • Cook = 1
  • Labor Foreman = 1
  • Laborer = 180
  • Mason = 1
  • Special Laborer = 1

Two laborers and one cook were paid on a monthly basis at $6/month each. The remaining 193 people were paid at a daily rate. The average daily pay rate was approximately 41 cents/day.

It seems apparent from these records that there seemed to be major pay wage disparities between Americans and Chamorro employees with the latter receiving significantly less. This was the beginning and would eventually (much later) become a public issue in front of Congress in 1947 among other key issues for Guam and her people.

However, some of these issues (but not all) were not addressed until the passage of the 1950 Organic Act. Some of these disparities were written about by former Guam Legislative Speaker Carlos Pangelinan Taitano in 1996.

Sources

Ancestry.com. US, Register of Civil, Military, and Naval Service, 1863-1959 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.

Department of Commerce and Labor, Bureau of the Census. Official Register of the United States, Containing a List of the Officers and Employees in the Civil, Military, and Naval Service. Digitized books (77 volumes). Oregon State Library, Salem, Oregon.

Taitano, Carlos P. 1996. Guam’s Political Development. Retrieved August 4, 2014 from: http://www.guampedia.com/guams-political-development/

(Click on "READ MORE" below to view all 199 names.)

Last Updated on Thursday, 07 August 2014 07:55 Read more...
 

1800s: From Whaling to US Navy Enlistments[0]

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I can’t seem to help but think about the variety of opportunity paths that may have spun off from those that ventured into whaling. Although I am not 100% certain, it seems that some of the “Bayenerus” (whalers) found the opportunity to enlist in the United States Navy during the 1800’s.

 

Last Name

First Name

Birth Year

Birth Place

Enlisted

Location

Aglur

Jose

1842

Guam

Sep 1861

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Andrews

Thomas

1842

Guam

Jul 1864

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Antonio

Francis

1835

Guam

Dec 1861

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Brown

Joe

1837

Guam

Nov 1862

Boston, Massachusetts

Brown

John

1839

Guam

Aug 1864

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Button

Benjamin

1839

Guam

Dec 1864

Boston, Massachusetts

Carter

Joseph

1841

Guam

Aug 1864

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Cepeda

Leon

1841

Guam

Apr 1862

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Dela Cruz

Mariano

1841

Guam

Dec 1861

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Dela Cruse

Philip

1844

Guam

Aug 1862

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Douty

John

1840

Guam

Nov 1862

Boston, Massachusetts

Ernandes

Alonzo

1843

Guam

Nov 1864

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Estredo

Joseph

1842

Guam

Aug 1862

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Flores

John

1846

Guam

Aug 1862

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Garido

Joseph

1842

Guam

Dec 1861

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Henry

Antone

1842

Guam

Sep 1864

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Leon

Vincente

1845

Guam

Mar 1863

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Micoto

Joseph

1828

Guam

Jul 1864

New York

Mindola

Peter

1840

Guam

May 1863

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Nicholas

John C

1843

Guam

Nov 1864

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Nichols

Joseph

1826

Guam

Jul 1864

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Rodgers

Andrew

1844

Guam

Jul 1864

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Rosario

Benjamin

1838

Guam

Aug 1862

New Bedford, Massachusetts

 

Perhaps one of the most notable whaling ships frequented the Mariana Islands was the Charles W. Morgan whaling ship. I briefly wrote about the Morgan and the Chamorro men who subsequently became crewmembers (http://www.chamorroroots.com/v3/index.php?option=com_content&;view=article&id=227%3Achamorro-whalers-of-the-charles-w-morgan-ship&catid=34%3Ahistory&Itemid=1)

If you have read beyond my initial article on the Morgan through other sources, you would know that the Morgan’s homeport was New Bedford, Massachusetts, the same city where the majority of where these Chamorro men enlisted in the US Navy.

Unfortunately, during my crosswalk review between the rosters I was not able to match any of the men from the Morgan and the Navy lists. But as you can see, many of the surnames from the Navy enlistments have likely morphed from its origin.

The main key word I searched on that generated this subset of records for these men was birthplace “Guam.” Nothing came up for the other Mariana Islands, which is not surprising since at the time Guam and Rota were the two main islands that the Spaniards contained the Chamorro people.

Click on the sample list below showing the enlistment of Mariano Dela Cruz in 1861. He was 20 years old, had dark eyes, black straight hair, copper color complexion, and was 5’ 4.5” tall.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 29 July 2014 02:26
 
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In order for this project to continue to grow, I have implemented a nominal $5/month subcription fee to access the Chamorro Roots Genealogy Project database. This fee can be paid through the Tendan Hale' Chamoru link. For newly Registered Users, there will be a one-time 3-day trial subscription granted automatically with new registrations. This trial offer is also to allow newly registered users the opportunity to experience the difference between the 'Demo Database' and the live database. Once the 3-day trial period has expired you will only have access to the Demo Database that has very limited features.

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I highly recommend taking advantage of and subscribing to the 'Chamorro Roots Library' subcription option, since its for one-year access and includes viewing the digital files available on this site for $60/year.  However, this fee is not prorated like the monthly subscription that is also only limited to accessing the database and not the digital archives.  I believe these subscription fees are nominal and quite reasonable compared to the other commercially available genealogy sites.

I appreciate your understanding and support to this upcoming change.  If you have any question please feel free to contact me.

Si Yu'os Ma'ase,

si Bernard Punzalan